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Research Management Policy

1. Purpose and objectives

2. Scope

3. Principles

4. Policy statements

4.1 Preparation and submission of a research proposal

4.2 Research contract negotiation and agreement

4.3 Commencement of the research project

4.4 Management and reporting activities throughout the project

4.5 Completion of the research project and project closure activities

5. Resolution of disputes arising from research management

6. Policy ownership and support

7. Definitions

Approval information

PDF version

References

1. Purpose and objectives

1.1 The Research Management Policy (the policy) provides a framework for effective research management, supporting the university’s research strategy through:

  • developing high-quality research funding applications
  • timely execution of project agreements
  • effective management of research projects, intellectual property (IP) and data, and
  • developing high-quality research outputs.

2. Scope

2.1 This policy applies to:

  • all staff, graduate research students, UTS affiliates and anyone conducting or managing research for UTS. UTS affiliates include honorary appointees, emeritus professors, conjoint appointments, contractors, volunteers, agency staff, members of university/faculty committees, and any other person appointed or engaged by UTS to perform work, duties or functions for UTS.
  • all research that requires an application for funding (internal or external) or top-ups (additional funding).

2.2 Relevant parts of this policy (research data management, research-generated IP and research outputs) also apply to unfunded research.

3. Principles

3.1 UTS is committed to the principles outlined in the Australian Code for the Responsible Conduct of Research (the Code).

3.2 In addition to the Code, UTS requires the following research management principles:

  • transparent costing and the financial sustainability of research
  • responsible reporting to, and necessary project completion procedures for, the funder
  • appropriate management of IP developed through research
  • appropriate management of research data to ensure that it is secure, accessible, interoperable, reusable, and compliant with legal obligations and the rules of funding bodies.

3.3 All those under the scope of this policy must comply with the Code and meet the requirements for effective research management as outlined in this policy, the Research Ethics and Integrity Policy and all associated supporting documents published by the Research and Innovation Office (RIO).

3.4 The university will not seek or accept research funding from the tobacco industry (as defined in this policy) through competitive grants, scholarships, fellowships, collaborative and contract research, donations or the licensing or sale of research-generated IP.

4. Policy statements

UTS recognises three different types of research:

  • funder-initiated and externally initiated research
  • academic-initiated funded research
  • academic-initiated unfunded research.

Research project lifecycles for funded research have five separate stages with associated responsibilities as shown in the following diagram.

Diagram 1. Research project lifecycles

Diagram 1. Research project lifecycles

For academic-initiated unfunded research which does not require investment of UTS funds or significant use of specialised research facilities, approval of unfunded research is managed through normal work-planning arrangements in the faculty or institute.

4.1 Preparation and submission of a research proposal (stage 1)

The First Named Chief Investigator (FNCI) is responsible for preparing and submitting research proposals, including the following tasks:

  • leading the development of a research proposal
  • providing a complete and transparent approach to the costing of all research projects to academic and research managers and research administrators within the university
  • carefully and accurately completing the costing and pricing of a research proposal before it is approved for submission to a funder
  • only agreeing on the price for research with a funder when the full costs and value of the research have been taken into account and the proposal is approved by the authorised UTS delegate(s)
  • gaining approval for research proposals and funding applications by both the FNCI’s faculty/institute and the relevant authorised UTS delegate (Delegation 5.1) before submission to the funder.

4.1.1 Costing and pricing a research proposal

The FNCI is required to undertake the following activities as part of their costing and pricing responsibilities:

  • utilise and check proposed costings included in the research proposal against the indicative list of costs and relevant infrastructure charges in the Guidelines for Research Proposals and Project Management (Staff Connect)
  • identify all direct and indirect costs in the proposal including full university infrastructure costs for all categories of research projects before the proposal is approved for submission to a funder, except for ARC and NHMRC grants or where rates of infrastructure are explicitly mandated by funders and for research arising from gifts and donations
  • complete the costing and pricing tool (available through the OPeN proposal submission process) for all research proposals, except for proposals to ARC and NHMRC, where their own costing tools can be used
  • check and ensure adherence to the deadlines set by RIO for submitting large funding applications (eg ARC and NHMRC)
  • clearly identify the value of the research to both the funder and to UTS to set the price for research. The price for research may be higher, lower or equal to the cost of research (refer to the Guidelines for Research Proposals and Project Management (Staff Connect) for further guidance on price setting of research).

4.1.2 Review, approval and submission of research proposals

Approval for all externally funded research proposals is by the FNCI’s faculty/institute and by the relevant authorised UTS delegate(s) before submission to the funder.

Faculties/institutes are responsible for:

  • reviewing and approving research project applications from FNCIs in their jurisdictions, for submission to the authorised UTS delegate for approval, and
  • complying with the requirements set out in the Guidelines for Research Proposals and Project Management (Staff Connect) when reviewing proposals.

The authorised UTS delegate (in accordance with Delegation 5.1) is responsible for:

  • managing the approval process within their area of delegation for all research project applications to external funders
  • taking all reasonable steps to ensure that the research funding proposal meets the funders eligibility requirements and complies with all funding rules and proposal guidelines, and
  • only submitting applications for funding that have been endorsed by the relevant faculty/institute through the OPeN system.

Philanthropic and donor funding requires review and feedback from the UTS Advancement Office (in line with Fundraising Approval Procedures (staff only)) before submission by the appropriate authorised UTS delegate for this type of funding.

Internally funded research which includes investment of faculty funds or significant use of specialised research facilities requires review and approval by FNCI’s faculty/institute or the appropriate UTS division.

Faculties and institutes may identify their own requirements for the allocation of research project funding from their own resources.

4.2 Research contract negotiation and agreement (stage 2)

The FNCI is responsible for:

  • accepting the research contracts they undertake in OPeN (see Guidelines for Research Project Management) (Staff Connect), and
  • gaining approval from the FNCI’s faculty/institute and the relevant authorised UTS delegate for all research contracts before a research contract is agreed with the research funder.

Faculties/institutes are responsible for approving contracts before sign-off by the authorised UTS delegate.

The authorised UTS delegate (in accordance with Delegation 5.1) is responsible for:

  • seeking the advice of UTS Legal on any terms and conditions in the project agreement that may expose UTS to legal risk, particularly for new funding agreements
  • determining whether formal changes to the contract are necessary and how to negotiate these changes on behalf of UTS
  • determining the course of action where the research funder offers less funding than the price set out in the research proposal (see Guidelines for Research Project Management for guidance on how to handle this situation) (Staff Connect), and
  • managing the approval and execution of any variations to research project agreements within their area of delegation.

4.2.1 Approval of externally commissioned unfunded research

Where a body or individual external to UTS commissions unfunded research, the FNCI is responsible for:

  • identifying and gaining approval for the research project through the OPeN project notification system, and
  • identifying, costing and gaining approval for the use of UTS resources in the research project from the authorised UTS delegate, in line with the Guidelines for Research Proposals and Project Management (Staff Connect).

Where a body or individual external to UTS commissions unfunded research, faculties/institutes are responsible for:

  • reviewing and approving research project applications from FNCIs in their jurisdiction for submission to the authorised UTS delegate for approval, and
  • complying with the requirements set out in the Guidelines for Research Proposals and Project Management (Staff Connect) when reviewing proposals.

The authorised UTS delegate (in accordance with Delegation 5.1) is responsible for managing the approval process within their area of delegation.

4.3 Commencement of the research project (stage 3)

Research projects must not commence until all applicable project agreements have been executed.

The FNCI is responsible for:

  • ensuring that all externally commissioned research projects do not commence until all applicable project agreements have been executed
  • ensuring that all necessary ethics approvals are obtained before work requiring ethics approval commences. For the university’s ethics requirements, see the Research Ethics and Integrity Policy and related guidelines.
  • ensuring the safety of the researchers and others affected by the research.

4.4 Management and reporting activities throughout the project (stage 4)

The FNCI is responsible for:

  • the conduct of the research, and the management, administration and reporting requirements of the research project
  • the management of the resources allocated to research projects.

The FNCI’s faculty or institute is responsible for providing sufficient post-award management and support of research projects across their faculty or institute.

RIO is responsible for monitoring that all reporting requirements under a research project agreement have been fulfilled during and at the completion of the project.

Financial Services Unit (FSU) is responsible for ensuring all financial reporting requirements under a research project agreement have been fulfilled during, and at the completion of, the project.

Guidance for conducting a research project is included in the Guidelines for Research Proposals and Project Management (Staff Connect).

4.4.1 Research data management throughout the project

The FNCI is responsible for:

  • understanding and complying with the Guidelines for Research Data Management (Staff Connect) in relation to the collection, management, storage, retention and disposal of research data, primary materials and records. Note that the Records Management Vice-Chancellor’s Directive also applies for all data and hard copy records.
  • developing a project agreement to manage data, as outlined section 4.2 above, in cases where a research project involves multiple institutions.

Manager, Research Integrity and Research Programs is responsible for reviewing, monitoring and auditing the control mechanisms and operations for research data management at UTS.

4.4.1.1 Research data management plans (RDMPs)

The FNCI is responsible for:

  • developing and maintaining a research data management plan (RDMP) where research data are collected or created as part of a research project
  • registering every RDMP in the approved UTS system for research data management as outlined in the Guidelines for the Management of Research Data (Staff Connect).

The Information Technology Division (ITD) is responsible for providing research data management systems that can report on the existence of research data management plans and on the existence of digital research data.

UTS Library is responsible for providing advice on research data management planning.

4.4.1.2 Storage of research data

The FNCI is responsible for:

  • the storage of research data and primary materials within university-approved storage systems and infrastructure, and
  • ensuring that UTS staff, affiliates and graduate research students involved in research store their research data and primary materials within university-approved storage systems and infrastructure.

All researchers are responsible for:

  • storing research data within the university’s storage systems and infrastructure (and not solely holding their own data). Local copies may be retained for use during the research project
  • taking reasonable steps to keep research data and primary materials secure
  • properly documenting research data and primary materials throughout their lifecycle and cataloguing with the appropriate metadata.

If it is not possible to utilise the university-approved storage due to contractual security, ethical or privacy requirements or because of technical issues, etc., the FNCI’s faculty or institute is responsible for storing research data, primary materials and any records.

ITD is responsible for providing and maintaining appropriate and secure central research data management infrastructure and systems for data management planning and the storage and archiving of digital research data.

4.4.1.3 Retention and disposal of research data

All researchers under the scope of this policy are responsible for retaining and managing sufficient research data, primary materials and records in an accessible form during and beyond the completion of a research project in order to:

  • meet the minimum requirements set out in this policy, the Code, any relevant ethics or biosafety approvals and the Records Management Vice-Chancellor’s Directive
  • justify the outcomes of the research
  • support the disclosure of intellectual property, whether owned by the university or an external party (for example, through the use of laboratory notebooks, enotebooks or other university-approved storage systems)
  • defend research findings
  • support reproducibility of the research findings, and
  • enable further research by sharing research data where appropriate, particularly where the data collection may be difficult or impossible to repeat
  • taking reasonable steps to demonstrate that other institutions support the principles outlined in the Code and this policy (subject to any privacy restrictions) in instances where data retention or storage has been delegated to services or institutions outside the university
  • retaining all relevant research data, primary materials and records that are or become the subject of any allegations of research integrity breaches, until the matter is resolved
  • disposing of the research data safely and securely at the end of the agreed retention period, in accordance with the Records Management Vice-Chancellor’s Directive and the Guidelines for Research Data Management (Staff Connect).
4.4.1.4 Access to research data

Research data should be made as accessible as possible to interested parties, in line with the Open Access Policy, with the following limitations:

  • where commercial, commercialisation, legal, technical, privacy or ethical constraints exist that prevents sharing of data
  • the researchers have the right to keep research data associated with publications confidential until the results have been published.

The FNCI’s faculty or institute is responsible for reaching agreements with staff or graduate research students who leave UTS regarding access to, and use of, research data, where not already covered by a project agreement.

4.4.2 Intellectual property (IP) developed from research

This section of the policy must be read in conjunction with the Intellectual Property Policy and the National Principles of Intellectual Property Management for Publicly Funded Research.

Under the Intellectual Property Policy, UTS is the IP owner in most circumstances, including research data created in the course of university employment.

Only with the approval of the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research) will the university enter into an agreement not to assert ownership of IP that has commercial value.

Where a research project spans multiple institutions, an agreement must be reached at the outset of the project that covers the management, storage, retention and disposal of research data and primary materials at each institution.

4.4.2.1 Students’ IP rights and responsibilities

Undergraduate students usually own their own research data and IP (as set out in the Intellectual Property Policy).

If the university asserts ownership of student-created IP, the student will be required to sign an assignment deed or agreement (see also further guidance in the Guidelines for Managing and Commercialising IP from Research Projects (Staff Connect).

Graduate research students usually own the IP rights in the research data they generate as part of their higher degree unless:

  • the data are subject to a project agreement, and/or
  • any IP rights owned by the student existing in the data has been separately assigned to the university under a specific agreement with the student, and/or
  • the data has been jointly developed with other project members and the student is a co-creator/author of the data.
4.4.2.2 UTS staff and researchers’ IP rights and responsibilities

The FNCI is responsible for the management of all contractual obligations in regards to IP, the management of confidential information and materials during any research, and for the dissemination of any contractual obligations to all project members involved in related activities.

Researchers are responsible for:

Researchers on a project must not:

  • enter into binding negotiations or come to agreements with third parties for the conduct of research or commercialisation of research-generated IP
  • pre-empt the university's negotiation of research contracts by intentionally or inadvertently making commitments on behalf of the university
  • sign confidentiality or non-disclosure agreements on behalf of the university (these can only be signed by the authorised UTS delegate), or
  • transfer university material relating to university IP without approval (transfer is negotiated by the Commercialisation Team in the Research and Innovation Office).

Research and Innovation Office (RIO) is responsible for:

  • supporting FNCIs with the identification and disclosure of research-generated IP, and
  • managing the protection and, where appropriate, commercialisation of research-generated IP.

The authorised UTS delegate is responsible for:

  • signing confidentiality or non-disclosure agreements on behalf of the university, and
  • only signing agreements to transfer any university material relating to UTS IP after negotiation by the RIO Commercialisation Team.

Further guidance on managing, commercialising and protecting university IP is provided in the Guidelines for Managing and Commercialising IP from Research Projects (Staff Connect).

4.4.3 Research outputs and authorship

Authorship of research outputs must be based on substantial scholarly contribution to the specific research project (and not on relative power, status or the time spent on routine work).

UTS acknowledges that researchers have a responsibility to acknowledge assistance and support for the research endeavour and does not permit the practice of honorary authorship.

It is essential to acknowledge assistance which does not meet the criteria for authorship in a research output.

Researchers are responsible for:

  • appropriately acknowledging all those who have contributed to authorship of a research output.
  • correctly attributing all publications arising from research undertaken at UTS (including access to expertise, resources, facilities or services within UTS) to the university in the author by-lines. The correct by-line wording must always begin with 'University of Technology Sydney', followed by any relevant faculty/institute/centre information. Examples of correct by-line wording are provided in the Guidelines for Authors of Research Outputs (Staff Connect).
  • ensuring that the UTS affiliation appears in addition to their primary affiliation, where the publishers’ convention permits, for instances where the researcher holds an honorary appointment at UTS with a primary affiliation at another university.

The UTS Library is responsible for providing support and advice to academics to correctly acknowledge UTS in their publications and updating their publication profiles online.

Where a research output has several authors, one co-author should be nominated, by agreement among all the authors, as executive author (or designated university author where the executive author is not from UTS) for all of the research outputs from the research project.

The executive author is responsible for the recordkeeping related to research outputs and for managing communication about research outputs with the publisher.

Further guidance on the authorship of research outputs is included in the Guidelines for Authors of Research Outputs (Staff Connect).

4.4.3.1 Data supporting research outputs

The FNCI is responsible for ensuring that on publication of a research output, the research data supporting the output is described in a dataset record in the approved UTS system for research data management(as outlined in the Guidelines for the Management of Research Data (Staff Connect) and that the data are as accessible as possible (see access to research data in this policy).

4.4.3.2 Research output data collection

UTS collects data on all of its research outputs on an annual basis. All academic staff are required to submit data on all of their authored research outputs to this annual collection.

This collection is guided by the Research Output Collection Specification (ROCS) (Staff Connect), which provides details concerning the research output data collection and the criteria for determining what constitutes a research output. These criteria encompass traditional and non-traditional research outputs.

The university aims to share its research and scholarship as widely as possible, enabling open, equitable, worldwide access to the research and scholarly output of UTS staff and students. Further guidance is available through the Open Access Policy.

4.5 Completion of the research project and project closure activities (stage 5)

In bringing a project to completion, the FNCI is responsible for:

  • providing a final report to the funder, the faculty/institute and RIO on completion of a research project (in accordance with the research agreement), or
  • when no date for a final report is specified in the research agreement, a final report should be provided within six months of project completion.

The content of the report will usually be specified by the funder.

While UTS recognises that the research outputs of many projects will take time to materialise, the emphasis on final reporting, as outlined in this policy, seeks to provide a summary of the research project and the financial acquittal of the project, although the identification of known research outputs at the time of final reporting is encouraged.

The Financial Services Unit (FSU) is responsible for coordinating with faculties to raise invoices or produce any financial reconciliation and audited statements for the project, as specified in the project agreement, and the subsequent closure of research project accounts.

4.5.1 Research investment accounts (RIAs)

Under certain conditions, a financial surplus generated in an externally funded research project may be eligible to be transfer into a research investment account (RIA).

FNCIs, centres and faculties may request the setting up of RIAs, which can be used to pool these eligible funds.

Guidance on the conditions for RIAs and how to set up RIAs is included in the Guidelines for Setting Up Research Investment Accounts (RIAs) (Staff Connect).

FSU is responsible for setting up all RIAs.

5. Resolution of disputes arising from research management

Disputes concerning any aspect of this policy should be resolved through the processes outlined in the UTS Code of Conduct, the Graduate Research and Supervision Policy or the Research Ethics and Integrity Policy.

6. Policy ownership and support

6.1 Policy owner

The Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research) is responsible for enforcement and compliance of this policy, ensuring that its principles and statements are observed. The DVC (Research) is also responsible for approval of any associated university-level procedures and for approving guidelines and user guides associated with this policy.

6.2 Policy contacts

The following UTS staff members are responsible for the implementation of this policy and act as primary points of contact for advice on implementing its provisions.

Director, Research and Innovation Office (RIO) is the primary point of contact for advice on implementing and administering this policy except for the policy sections implemented by the officers detailed below. The Director, RIO is also responsible for maintaining the official file, for proposing amendments as required and for managing the consultation process when the policy is due for review.

Manager, Research Integrity and Research Programs (Office of DVC (Research)) is the officer responsible for overseeing the mechanisms in operation and monitoring controls to ensure that UTS research data are stored, retained, made accessible for use and reuse and/or disposed of, according to legal, statutory, ethical and funding bodies requirements.

Associate Deans (Research) and institute directors are responsible for managing faculty and institute accountabilities in this policy and for promoting awareness of the research policy environment within the faculty/institute.

Director, Information Technology Division (ITD) is the primary point of contact for IT systems and storage advice in relation to research data management.

University Librarian is the primary point of contact for advice on research data management planning.

Dean, Graduate Research School is the primary point of contact for advice on implementing and administering research authorship.

Chief Financial Officer, Financial Services Unit (FSU) is the primary point of contact for advice on implementing and administering RIAs, financial acquittals of research projects, and closure of financial activity codes for research projects.

7. Definitions

The definitions in this policy and Schedule 1, Student Rules apply for this policy and all associated procedures.

ARC is the Australian Research Council.

Authorised delegate means the holder of a position that has a delegation in respect of research management under section 5 of the Delegations, in particular, those delegates listed in Delegation 5.1 (external research grants and agreements).

Commercial activity is defined by the Commercial Activities Policy.

Commercialisation Team means the delegated university representatives nominated by the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research) who are responsible for negotiating the commercial arrangements on behalf of the university.

Commissioned unfunded research means research requested by a company, individual, government agency or non-government agency, where UTS would normally expect to be funded but, in this case, is not funded. This also applies to another university, where they have funding for research but are not prepared to subcontract to UTS to fund our research. It does not apply to unfunded research for purely collaborative purposes between universities.

Contract research means research done on a fee-for-service basis.

Cost of research is the value of the money used to produce the research, including infrastructure costs (defined below) and investigator time. An indicative and non-exhaustive list of activities to be included in the cost of research is given in the Guidelines for Research Proposals and Project Management (Staff Connect).

Disposal means the action or process undertaken at the end of the required retention period, and can include archiving, transfer of custody or ownership, or destruction of research data and primary materials.

Donation means a voluntary transfer of money or property to the university by way of benefaction, where the donor receives no material benefit from the university in return.

Donor means any person or organisation making a donation to the university.

Executive author (also known as the lead author or senior author), as defined in the Australian Code for the Responsible Conduct of Research, is the person whose responsibility it is to record authorship and to manage communication about the research output with the publisher.

First-Named Chief Investigator (FNCI) means the named UTS academic staff member responsible for the development, conduct, reporting and delivery of research project outcomes and who is named first in any listing of research team members. This includes the principal supervisor of a graduate research student.

Funder or funding body means any person or organisation external to UTS that provides funding for the conduct of research.

Gift (see donation).

Infrastructure costs/charges refer to the cost of providing the environment, facilities and support for research. Infrastructure charges are also the way in which UTS demonstrates commercial neutrality to state and federal government, particularly in contract research.

Metadata means the information which describes and organises data and data collections, which will facilitate later interpretation and reuse.

National competitive grants mean research grants awarded by funding authorities listed on the Australian Competitive Grants Register published annually by the Australian Government.

NHMRC is the National Health and Medical Research Council.

OPeN means the university’s online research project notification system within Research Master.

Post-award means following the award of research funding (whether internal or external).

Price of research is the amount paid by an external party for the research.

Primary materials are physical objects acquired through a process of scholarly investigation from which research data may be derived. Examples include raw physical materials such as rock samples or biological materials, or physical artefacts such as film, photographs or recordings (not stored or available elsewhere).

Project agreement (also called a funding agreement or research contract) means any document including but not limited to a contract for research services, an acceptance letter or a work order or internal approval, that commits the university to the receipt of funds or to otherwise undertake a research project.

Project members are UTS staff, affiliates and/or students working on or informed about a research project.

Research data means data collected or created during research, used to validate research findings and/or used to enable reproduction of the research. Research data may include but is not limited to:

  • experimental results and the contents of lab notebooks
  • significant numerical or graphic results obtained as the result of analysis of experimental results
  • significant numerical or graphic results obtained as the output of simulations, modelling or other software
  • images or visualisations
  • responses to surveys or questionnaires
  • records of interviews in the form of notes, audio or video recordings
  • clinical records of treatments and test results
  • other source or primary materials, in particular where these may be necessary to validate research results
  • other recorded data that is of significance to research undertaken by the university's researchers.

Research outputs: The outputs of research can be made public in many forms, including but not limited to journal articles, conference papers, monographs, Non-Traditional Research Outputs and web-based products.

Research project means a project that has investigation as a primary objective and has the potential to contribute new knowledge, both theoretical and practical.

Research proposal (or proposal) includes funding applications for competitive grants (including those that are led by another institution), tenders, contract research proposals, expressions of interest, intellectual property commercialisation and fellowships.

Research records means any documentation or information prepared, maintained or stored as evidence by the university or individuals for use in their work, and includes correspondence (hardcopy and electronic), grant application documentation, human or animal ethics protocols (applications, approvals and related documents), signed participant consent forms and information sheets for research participants, research data management plans, authorship agreements, technical reports, research reports (to project or funding board) and other items like these.

Substantial scholarly contribution means contributing considerably to a research output in the following ways:

  • conception and design of the research and the gathering of data
  • determination, analysis and interpretation of research data
  • drafting or revision of significant parts of the research output so as to contribute to the interpretation, and
  • final approval for the publication of the research output.

Surplus is the price of research minus the full cost of research.

Tobacco industry means individuals, divisions of corporations and other entities that primarily manufacture, market or advocate the use of tobacco products.

Approval information

Policy contact Director, Research and Innovation Office
Approval authority Academic Board
Review date 2021
Version 1
File number UR17/3686
Superseded documents Research Management Directive (file: UR10/983)
Authorship Vice-Chancellor’s Directive (file: UR10/983)
Costing and Prising of Research Vice-Chancellor’s Directive (file: UR14/463)
Research Data Management Vice-Chancellor’s Directive (file: UR14/249)
Research Funding from the Tobacco Industry Policy (file: UR 12/1468)
Research Investment Accounts Procedures (file: UR14/464)
Research Generated Intellectual Property Vice-Chancellor’s Directive (file: UR07/192)

Version history

Version Approved by Approval date Effective date Sections modified
1.0 Academic Board (AB/17-2/35) 7 June 2017 1 January 2018 New policy.

PDF version

Research Management Policy

References

Research guidelines (Staff Connect):

  • Authors of Research Outputs
  • Management of Research Data
  • Managing and Commercialising IP from Research Projects
  • Research Data Management
  • Research Intellectual Property
  • Research Proposals and Project Management
  • Research Project Management
  • Setting Up Research Investment Accounts (RIAs)

Australian Code for the Responsible Conduct of Research

Code of Conduct

Commercial Activities Policy

Delegations

Fundraising Approval Procedures (staff only)

Graduate Research and Supervision Policy

Intellectual Property Policy

Open Access Policy

National Principles of Intellectual Property Management for Publicly Funded Research

Records Management Vice-Chancellor’s Directive

Research Ethics and Integrity Policy

Research Output Collection Specification (ROCS) (Staff Connect)

Schedule 1, Student Rules